Only a small point I guess in the grand scheme of  local things, however does anyone else find it irritating that anyone getting off a train at Hampton in the evening rush hour, has to wait 5 minutes whilst everyone squeezes through a narrow exit? There hasnt been a guard there for at least 20 years and not everyone had an oyster card that they need to 'touch out', so why make it so difficult? Surely the gap can be widened to make it easier?

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I totally agree seems silly considering the amount of money for improvements to the station in the last year or so...new bridge for example...I just don't get it.

I suppose that there is a requirement for the train operators to be at least afforded the opportunity to protect their revenue. It's a rare occurrence but ticket inspectors do operate at the station now and again and if there was a much wider exit then it would make it all but impossible to do their jobs - certainly they would probably have to consider barriers and I don't think that would add to the station at all.

How about trying to reduce the amount of people at any one time by increasing the frequency of trains especially at rush hour. I'm sure this is something only SWT can sort out but in the 6 or so years that I have been here the amount of people getting on and off the train has increased dramiaticaly, surely the powers that be can see the need for a revised timetable!?!?
I'm sure there is absolutly no chance of this but worth a mention?

Gareth Roberts said:

I suppose that there is a requirement for the train operators to be at least afforded the opportunity to protect their revenue. It's a rare occurrence but ticket inspectors do operate at the station now and again and if there was a much wider exit then it would make it all but impossible to do their jobs - certainly they would probably have to consider barriers and I don't think that would add to the station at all.

Gareth. I take your point but to squeeze everyone through a narrow gap multiple times each and every day just to facilitate a ticket check once in a blue moon seems absurdly disproportionate, especially in a low crime area. Where's the risk-based, customer focused common sense in that? Most of us would have got on at a station where you needed a ticket to get on in the first place. 

Chris said:
How about trying to reduce the amount of people at any one time by increasing the frequency of trains especially at rush hour. I'm sure this is something only SWT can sort out but in the 6 or so years that I have been here the amount of people getting on and off the train has increased dramiaticaly, surely the powers that be can see the need for a revised timetable!?!? I'm sure there is absolutly no chance of this but worth a mention?

Gareth Roberts said:

I suppose that there is a requirement for the train operators to be at least afforded the opportunity to protect their revenue. It's a rare occurrence but ticket inspectors do operate at the station now and again and if there was a much wider exit then it would make it all but impossible to do their jobs - certainly they would probably have to consider barriers and I don't think that would add to the station at all.

I completely agree and have two thoughts:

1) A wider opening that can selectively be narrowed by sliding a gate or closing a barrier would help us move in/out the station more easily and help guards to police the dateline occasionally.

2) Moving one of the oyster card readers to the opposite side of the gateway would prevent everyone from having to lean across to the two co-located machines. A quick tip for those in a hurry or who get stranded on the wrong side of the throng of people is to swipe your oyster card on the other side of the bridge. It has just the same effect but with 10% of the hassle (assuming you're going that way).

Hi Everybody,

I know I have said this all before, but maybe there is somebody out there who has not heard it before !!! When I was 15 years old I worked at W H Smith & Son on the up platform (To Waterloo) of Hampton Station. My manager George Pike M.M. was a First World War Hero. He had been a sergeant in The Royal Fusiliers and had had won his Military Medal in France (Today it would be a Military Cross). The Station had a Station Master who lived at the station house. There was five porters who helped passengers with their luggage as well as manning the station until the last train had left. The Booking Office was manned from the first train until 10pm. There were public toilets on both platforms. I am sorry to say, not everything in Hampton has improved. I may start on the Police Station next !!! Bryan.

I hadn't heard it Bryan, nice story...how were the local shops back then?
Had another thought/angle on this - whilst accepting the need for SWT to protect revenue, they also have a Health and Safety responsibility and I would suggest that the inevitable queue that builds at the exit does create a H&S risk as passengers end up creating a 'bulge' around the exit which crosses over the yellow 'safety' line. I was coming home yesterday and there was a 'Meet the SWT Managers' stand at Waterloo and so raised the issue with them which they have agreed to investigate and come back to me with their thoughts. You never know . . . . . . . . . .


Hi Chris,

When I have time you will get a reply about local shops. Regards. Bryan
Chris said:

I hadn't heard it Bryan, nice story...how were the local shops back then?
What wonderful Memories of British Rail .
My 88 Father worked for BR or LMR all his working life 
And has similar Memories .
Would be similarly fascinating to hear and see how 
Hampton was then .
Being on the Nostalgia I love it 
Thank you Bryan

Bryan Alderson B.E.M. said:

Hi Everybody,

I know I have said this all before, but maybe there is somebody out there who has not heard it before !!! When I was 15 years old I worked at W H Smith & Son on the up platform (To Waterloo) of Hampton Station. My manager George Pike M.M. was a First World War Hero. He had been a sergeant in The Royal Fusiliers and had had won his Military Medal in France (Today it would be a Military Cross). The Station had a Station Master who lived at the station house. There was five porters who helped passengers with their luggage as well as manning the station until the last train had left. The Booking Office was manned from the first train until 10pm. There were public toilets on both platforms. I am sorry to say, not everything in Hampton has improved. I may start on the Police Station next !!! Bryan.

Just while we're on railway related gripes a very small and tangential one from me.

 

The new flats opposite the station, the ones that used to be the Railway Hotel..........Junction Court........ they're nowhere near a junction. They're on a branch line.

 

Sorry but that's been niggling for a while and as we're going through a fallow period in terms of board posts I thought I'd get it off my chest!

At last I can sit down and get my thinking cap on. I cannot compete with John Sheaf our local historian and most of what I am about to say, I have said before. I lived with my parents in Oldfield Road from 1940 until I was called up to do my National Service in 1951. The road had it's own shop Mrs Hancock's She and her husband had bought and lived above the shop, after they had both retired from private service. Mr Hancock had been the butler and his wife had been the cook, in a large London residence. Mrs Hancock was a very good cook,I can confirm that. My mother sometimes ventured over the railway bridge to do her food shop in 'Perks' (Now Syzygy). On the corner of Oldfield and Percy Road was 'Blake's the sweet shop. Not that Mrs Blake had many sweets to sell. Our ration was 12ozs of sweets per person per month. Next to this shop in Percy Road was 'Harry Lusher's the shoe repairers. In the parade of shops in Oldfield Road, there was a small working mans cafe, next door was 'Hill's the fish monger and next door to that was 'East's the green grocer.I remember my mother used to get our rations for a family of five in a small cardboard box.10ozs of butter and 2.5lbs of sugar had to last the five of us 7 days. Linden Road had a corner shop, in fact most roads had a shop. But not the 'Posh' roads !!! Hampton Junior School was an ambulance station and clinic. It was covered in sand bags.  We juniors went to school at the old Hampton Grammer School in Oldfield Road. We used to spend many hours in the school Air Raid Shelters, during air raids. The level crossing had very large wooden gates and a manned signal box on the north east corner of the station. The signalman would open and close the gates.Where the new Waitrose stands today that used to be the Goods and Coal yards. There were electric trains Shepperton to Waterloo. But when a steam train blew it's whistle before going through Hampton Station, us kids knew it was a train load of German POWs on their way to the POW Camp at Kempton Park. We would all race to the level crossing to wave our fists at the POWs, much to their amusement. One night during the 'Blitz' a very large bomb fell on the shops each side of Warfield Road and demolished them all, including a very big house. My mother always referred to it as 'The Dutchmans house'. (This is where the block of flats stands now). They were good times for us children. No cars, day light until 11pm, we could always play in the streets. We behaved ourselves, there was a lot of policemen to see to that !!! Well I could go on but, I think I had better stop now. Regards. Bryan.

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