Only a small point I guess in the grand scheme of  local things, however does anyone else find it irritating that anyone getting off a train at Hampton in the evening rush hour, has to wait 5 minutes whilst everyone squeezes through a narrow exit? There hasnt been a guard there for at least 20 years and not everyone had an oyster card that they need to 'touch out', so why make it so difficult? Surely the gap can be widened to make it easier?

Views: 2443

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I just love hearing how Hampton was .

Thank you Brian !

I am a relative newcomer moving here from North London 29 years ago and we lived in Warfield Road when we first arrived .

I can remember thinking that I had moved to the country .It was a different world from St Johns Wood N.W 8 where I was 

born and bred .

Come to think of it I still feel I moved to the Country .


Bryan Alderson B.E.M. said:

At last I can sit down and get my thinking cap on. I cannot compete with John Sheaf our local historian and most of what I am about to say, I have said before. I lived with my parents in Oldfield Road from 1940 until I was called up to do my National Service in 1951. The road had it's own shop Mrs Hancock's She and her husband had bought and lived above the shop, after they had both retired from private service. Mr Hancock had been the butler and his wife had been the cook, in a large London residence. Mrs Hancock was a very good cook,I can confirm that. My mother sometimes ventured over the railway bridge to do her food shop in 'Perks' (Now Syzygy). On the corner of Oldfield and Percy Road was 'Blake's the sweet shop. Not that Mrs Blake had many sweets to sell. Our ration was 12ozs of sweets per person per month. Next to this shop in Percy Road was 'Harry Lusher's the shoe repairers. In the parade of shops in Oldfield Road, there was a small working mans cafe, next door was 'Hill's the fish monger and next door to that was 'East's the green grocer.I remember my mother used to get our rations for a family of five in a small cardboard box.10ozs of butter and 2.5lbs of sugar had to last the five of us 7 days. Linden Road had a corner shop, in fact most roads had a shop. But not the 'Posh' roads !!! Hampton Junior School was an ambulance station and clinic. It was covered in sand bags.  We juniors went to school at the old Hampton Grammer School in Oldfield Road. We used to spend many hours in the school Air Raid Shelters, during air raids. The level crossing had very large wooden gates and a manned signal box on the north east corner of the station. The signalman would open and close the gates.Where the new Waitrose stands today that used to be the Goods and Coal yards. There were electric trains Shepperton to Waterloo. But when a steam train blew it's whistle before going through Hampton Station, us kids knew it was a train load of German POWs on their way to the POW Camp at Kempton Park. We would all race to the level crossing to wave our fists at the POWs, much to their amusement. One night during the 'Blitz' a very large bomb fell on the shops each side of Warfield Road and demolished them all, including a very big house. My mother always referred to it as 'The Dutchmans house'. (This is where the block of flats stands now). They were good times for us children. No cars, day light until 11pm, we could always play in the streets. We behaved ourselves, there was a lot of policemen to see to that !!! Well I could go on but, I think I had better stop now. Regards. Bryan.

We have lived in Hampton 34 years, Mr and Mrs East had the greengrocers, the cafe now, Mr East Snr. had the now, barbers or was it the indian takeaway,  where he sold allsorts. My husbands uncle manned the signal box at the station. I cant remember the couple that had the sweet shop and newsagent, then i think it was them that turned the grocery shop all into one. loved reading about old Hampton. thanks Bryan.

The cafe is still owned by the East family albeit leased out to a 3rd party, Hampton was awash with greengrocers before Sainsburys came along, the corner shop (now part of Hampton supermarket) wasn't they called Bull?

In my young days the Waitrose site was an ice cream factory, this was demolished and became SMT (Swedish Machine Tools) next to that was a British Rail lorry park and next again was the Hampton Youth Club, later demolished in favour of the block of flats which were built in it's place. The 'new' side of Oldfield Road (Mason Close side) was pre-fabs close to the road and behind them was a football pitch which, i assume, must have been connected with the Grammar School.   
 
Teresa said:

We have lived in Hampton 34 years, Mr and Mrs East had the greengrocers, the cafe now, Mr East Snr. had the now, barbers or was it the indian takeaway,  where he sold allsorts. My husbands uncle manned the signal box at the station. I cant remember the couple that had the sweet shop and newsagent, then i think it was them that turned the grocery shop all into one. loved reading about old Hampton. thanks Bryan.

I think it was Mr & Mrs Bull, the Old Hampton Youth Club in Oldfield Road, was a play school in the mornings run by Rene, both my sons went there, £1 per morning.
 
Trevor Mason said:

The cafe is still owned by the East family albeit leased out to a 3rd party, Hampton was awash with greengrocers before Sainsburys came along, the corner shop (now part of Hampton supermarket) wasn't they called Bull?

In my young days the Waitrose site was an ice cream factory, this was demolished and became SMT (Swedish Machine Tools) next to that was a British Rail lorry park and next again was the Hampton Youth Club, later demolished in favour of the block of flats which were built in it's place. The 'new' side of Oldfield Road (Mason Close side) was pre-fabs close to the road and behind them was a football pitch which, i assume, must have been connected with the Grammar School.   
 
Teresa said:

We have lived in Hampton 34 years, Mr and Mrs East had the greengrocers, the cafe now, Mr East Snr. had the now, barbers or was it the indian takeaway,  where he sold allsorts. My husbands uncle manned the signal box at the station. I cant remember the couple that had the sweet shop and newsagent, then i think it was them that turned the grocery shop all into one. loved reading about old Hampton. thanks Bryan.

You should write a book Bryan. Always love reading reading your posts and topics :)

As things are very quiet I will write a bit more about old Hampton. You will have to forgive me when I repeat myself, This is a problem with all old boys !!! The main entrance to the old Grammer School was on the Upper Sunbury Road. But we all used the Oldfield Road entrance. The school had an enormous field. At the bottom of the field opposite the factories were some underground air raid shelters. In the early part of the war, until we got our own 'Anderson' shelter, my mother, us kids and other Hampton folk would spend the nights in the factory shelters. This involved my mother carrying all our blankets to the shelter to enable us to get some sleep. I don't think there was any electric lighting. What I do remember, the toilet was a very large tin bucket at one end of the shelter and there was no sound proofing !!! We would go home for our breakfast, then it would be off to school. There was two factories at the west end of Olfield Road ie Hall and Hall and Gay Brothers. Gay Brothers was an engineering factory. They had their wooden patterns in a very large shed in the school grounds. One night during the 'Blitz' Gerry dropped hundreds of incendiary bombs most of which landed in the school grounds. Gay's pattern shed was burnt to the ground. It was still smouldering when we went to school. The field was littered with dozens of intact incendiary bombs. The kids were pulling them out of the ground and taking them home. My elder brother (Years later he became the Chief Inspector at the Police Traffic Garage in Station Road), managed to bring home two of the bombs, which stood on our Mantelpiece. It was OK they did not explode, otherwise I would not be writing this now. Towards the end of the War Gerry started sending over 'Flying Bombs' (Doodle Bugs) one landed in the reservoir opposite the school on the Upper Sunbury Road and blew all the widows out. We then had a very extended summer holiday. Thanks to Adolf Hitler I could never spell !!! I will tell you about the YWCA Club next time. Yours aye. Bryan.

Hi Patricia, Teresa And Jason,

Thank you, it is good to know somebody out there is reading my ramblings. I have a correction to make to the above. I am getting my air raid shelters mix up My family did not have an 'Anderson' shelter. That was the one that had to be half under ground in the back garden. A bit cold in the winter and it often filled up with water, but the idea was good.. We had a 'Morrison' shelter. That was a large steel table that was inside the house. My mother and us three kids slept in side and my dad slept on top. But when the bombing and anti aircraft guns became too heavy, my dad would crawl inside with the rest of us. The theory was if the house was bombed the shelter would withstand the house falling on it. Not so good if the house caught on fire. Yours. Bryan.

I look forward to reading your " ramblings " thank you.
 
Bryan Alderson B.E.M. said:

Hi Patricia, Teresa And Jason,

Thank you, it is good to know somebody out there is reading my ramblings. I have a correction to make to the above. I am getting my air raid shelters mix up My family did not have an 'Anderson' shelter. That was the one that had to be half under ground in the back garden. It often filled up with water, but the idea was good.. We had a 'Morrison' shelter. That was a large steel table that was inside the house. My mother and us three kids slept in side and my dad slept on top. But when the bombing and anti aircraft guns became too heavy, my dad would crawl inside with the rest of us. The theory was if the house was bombed the shelter would withstand the house falling on it. Not so good if the house caught on fire. Yours. Bryan.

I just love your ramblings Bryan and I second the Book proposal !

All good wishes 

Patricia

Bryan, I must endorse Patricia and many others to say that your memories, which you document so well, are VERY intresting indeed. All your memories form part of this country's fantastic heritage. They were 'happy days', ( with a few exceptions) weren't they? Whilst my following comment may be contentious. I often feel very sad that in the streets of today, we have lost our high standards of being British, e.g. manners, discipline, honesty etc, etc. The general ' Britishness ' which you so wonderfully recall in all the little businesses of Hampton were wonderful years.. In my view, I wish we could turn the clock back to the 1950's, post war. I know it is not possible. Thank goodness there are still villages and small towns in this country that still retain the true old fashioned British values. Bryan, please keep up your writings on your memories, and I look forward to buying your documented memories of Hampton, and will pay extra for an autographed  copy!  Many thanks Bryan
 
patricia ann morgan said:

I just love your ramblings Bryan and I second the Book proposal !

All good wishes 

Patricia

Can I have a copy too - I would love to read Bryans memoirs - I will double your bid for signed copy Charles!

What an Interesting life & wonderful writing.

Me too please.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2019   Created by Matt D.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service